Sachin Tendulkar to retire after last Test Match Again WI

[JUGRAJ SINGH]

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Re: Sachin Tendulkar to retire after last Test Match Again






Sachin Tendulkar will be the cynosure of all eyes in India as the legend prepares to play his 200th and final Test against the West Indies from Thursday.

Keep things simple, make it special for Sachin Tendulkar: MS Dhoni tells team
India skipper Mahendra Singh Dhoni Wednesday had a special advice for his team mates who want to do something special for Sachin Tendulkar, who plays his 200th and farewell Test against the West Indies beginning here Thursday -- keep it simple.

"As far as the team is concerned, we'd like to keep it simple. That would be a big thing. Everyone wants to do something special, if we can keep it simple, that itself would be special. If someone does something simple when everyone else is trying special, that's good. We have a few things in our mind, but I think cricket is very important first and foremost. We're going to concentrate on it and enjoy it," said Dhoni on the eve of the match at the Wankhede Stadium.

Dhoni said it was important for Tendulkar to enjoy his swansong.

"I'd like him to enjoy, because you can't guarantee performance. Of course, you can say (hope he gets) a hundred, a double hundred, a triple hundred or 500, whatever. But at the end of the day the most important moment is that it is his last Test match. It's important that he enjoys this and hopefully gets us a few wickets ... You can get a bit of turn and bounce on this Mumbai wicket," said Dhoni.

Asked if there has been a change in Tendulkar's body language, Dhoni said: "His body language has been exactly the same as it was in the last match, or vs Australia (in the last Test series)."

With both the Indian cricket board and the Mumbai Cricket Association (MCA) planning their own felicitation ceremonies, Dhoni said the team was trying to stay focussed.

"As I said in the last match also we're treating it as normal as possible. Of course, there are plenty of things that are going around, so we've kept the focus and the drive. They're enjoying the moment, which I feel is the key, but at the same time we're focussed," he said.

Dhoni was also surprised with the hype surrounding the match.

"I think it's in the cricketing history ... this has never happened in the past, let alone the 8-10 years that I've been around," he said.

But he doesn't see hype as a distraction.

"It's too late to ask whether it's a distraction or not because whatever has happened has happened. I think it's a big part and parcel of the game. It's a big historic moment, and people are trying to do whatever they can, and we don't really mind that," said Dhoni.

The India captain said he was fortunate to play alongwith Tendulkar for 10 years.

"I never thought that I'd get to play with him, and if I've played eight-ten years with him, I'm very fortunate. He's guided the youngsters very well, showed them how to lead life after you become successful, and at the same time how you're supposed to prepare. So I think he's been fantastic and we've learnt a lot from him."

Dhoni also refused to disclose if he would allow Tendulkar to lead the side like he did five years ago during Sourav Ganguly's farewell Test.

"You'll have to wait and watch five days, I want you to concentrate," he said.

Paying rich tribute to Tendulkar, Dhoni said: "As far as Sachin is concerned, I would consider him as great because when it comes to Indian cricket, you're under the microscope throughout. It's not only the cricketing aspect; I think what's difficult is to handle things in India more than how to handle the success, the expectations of the people. We're expected to win each and every game, which is not possible.

"Yes, there are other greats, but there was one thing they didn't have to deal with, and that's the level of expectations. When you're doing well that itself puts pressure on you. But imagine when you're going through a lean patch, the expectations go up, they never come down."


 

[JUGRAJ SINGH]

Prime VIP
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Re: Sachin Tendulkar to retire after last Test Match Again

Pakistan legends Waqar Younis, Shoaib Akhtar rate Sachin Tendulkar as greatest in the world

There are paeans being sung for Sachin Tendulkar all over the country. Every expert and cricketer has a word of praise for the maestro. However, it all pales in comparison when two of the most fearsome bowlers the legend faced say he is the best in the world.

Pakistan bowling greats Waqar Younis and Shoaib Akhtar rated Tendulkar the best in the world ahead of Brian Lara, Ricky Ponting and even their teammate Inzamam-ul-Haq.

“He is right at the top in the world,” was how Younis thought of Tendulkar, while Akhtar called him the “greatest player” at an event here on Tuesday.

When Younis and Akhtar, who redefined aggression, praise a batsman who went after them in the field, the player does not need any other certificate. Especially, considering the intense rivaly.

Akhtar said that he was proud to get Tendulkar’s wicket. “He has changed the history of cricket.
He’s the world’s greatest player. I felt great when I got him out and I take pride when he did not hit me out of the park,” he said.

Younis added, “From being a boy, he went on to rule the world of cricket. All the four Tests of that series (1988/89) were played on greenish pitches and he played very well. He’s right at the top. Not only in subcontinent he has scored outside too. His statistics are the proof.”

Akhtar said he was not aware of Tendulkar’s popularity till he met him for the first time in Kolkata.
He also clarified that he never said that the Indian batsman was afraid of his pace bowling.

“I never said he was afraid of fast bowling, but I thought he was a bit casual when he came out to bat after I had bowled Rahul Dravid. The ball was swinging and I wanted to bowl a swinging yorker. When he was out, I was stunned by the reaction of the crowd. I had no idea when I came to India that Sachin is so big this country,” he recalled.

Remembering the famous cut over point that went for six during the 2003 World Cup where Tendulkar scored a 75-ball 98 at Centurion, Akhtar said it was difficult to bowl to him.

“I struggled with the line. He thrashed me, the faster I bowled the harder he hit me. He hit me for a six over point. He batted amazingly and from the first ball looked very focused,” he said.

Waqar reminisced about the bouncer that injured Tendulkar on his debut Test against Pakistan. “He was hit on the nose off the glove and the injury was not as bad. He did not fall down. After a few minutes he started batting again,” said Waqar.

Waqar rated Tendulkar’s 136 in a losing cause in the Chennai Test of 1999 against Pakistan as his best knock he has seen.

“Saqlain and Afridi were turning the ball square. The way he batted was amazing. Then he mishit and got out when India needed 13 runs to win and we wrapped up the remaining wickets in two-three overs,” said Waqar.
 

[JUGRAJ SINGH]

Prime VIP
Staff member
Re: Sachin Tendulkar to retire after last Test Match Again

Sachin Tendulkar's year at Headingley changed Yorkshire cricket forever

Sachin Tendulkar did not rewrite the record books at Yorkshire in 1992, but he certainly left a legacy and made many friends.

A piece of Sachin Tendulkar will remain forever Yorkshire. He depicts his unlikely allegiance with the White Rose, consummated in the heady summer of 1992, as “one of the greatest four-and-a-half months I have spent in my life”.
And yet to savour the most exotic flavour of this chapter of Tendulkar the Tyke one needs to plot a course beyond Headingley, to the Texaco garage on Savile Road in Dewsbury, above which Solly Adam still cherishes the memories of when the young Sachin was neither the Little Master nor even a star, but simply the deferential teenage guest at his dining-room table.
“He would come for Indian food at my house, and my wife and sister-in-law would iron his clothes,” says Adam, the garrulous businessman and self-made cricketing kingmaker whose extensive web of local-league contacts in old Bombay helped anoint Tendulkar as Yorkshire’s first non-white player.
“Whenever he was free we would take him to weddings or the cinema. We would go up to Leeds for Kentucky Fried Chicken - for some reason he loved it.”
It was a time of such innocence that Adam, personally invited by Tendulkar to the farewell of kaleidoscopic madness in Mumbai this week, can barely believe it happened. “It clicks in my mind every time I see him now,” the 61-year-old admits. “He is the god of cricket, mobbed whenever he steps outside his house, but here in the early Nineties he could be freer. We gave him a small Honda car with his name on and still he would not be bothered.”[/img]
 

[JUGRAJ SINGH]

Prime VIP
Staff member
Re: Sachin Tendulkar to retire after last Test Match Again

Sachin Tendulkar: 'It's simple, India is in love with him'
India is going weak-kneed as its hero prepares to play his 200th and final Test against the West Indies


Sachin Tendulkar tiptoed with some difficulty down the steps of the Wankhede Stadium pavilion, loaded with two sets of pads, a helmet and two bats as a lone kid, invited to watch practice, stretched his arm up from behind the partition grille, hoping for the autograph that every Indian boy wants.
It did not look promising yet somehow Tendulkar managed to extricate one hand to sign and make another dream come true. As usual. The way in which the boy’s look of desperation turned to melting joy could have stood for a nation’s mood of anxiety and pleasure. Please, Sachin, just one more time.
Thursday will mark the start of the 40-year-old’s farewell to cricket in India’s second Test against West Indies, an event of such magnitude here in the little titan’s home city of Mumbai that it is impossible to credit the fever, fervour, high emotion – and, yes, plain silliness – that is being generated. It feels like sport’s most spectacular act of veneration.
As the murals of that cherubic face were being painted along with the faces of his craziest fans, an armoured personnel carrier was leading the Indian team bus into the Wankhede for practice with hundreds sprinting and screaming alongside, thrusting arms aloft brandishing mobile phone cameras just for an image of their God.
Meanwhile, the man himself was looking shyly out the window, having thought he must have seen it all now. He certainly had not heard it all, for in a hotel across the city, a surreal whole day’s homage, called the Salaam Sachin Conclave, was underway, featuring a non-stop series of luminaries, like Brian Lara and Sunil Gavaskar, pontificating about Tendulkar’s greatness. For hour upon hour.[/img]
 

[JUGRAJ SINGH]

Prime VIP
Staff member
Re: Sachin Tendulkar to retire after last Test Match Again

Sachin Tendulkar: The last walk
MUMBAI: Last night was the night when He may have gone to bed one last time thinking of the legendary jitters He's been used to before the start of a match.

An early dinner perhaps, a short chat with teammates, a small prayer before the Ganesha idol that He always keeps with him, a last customary taping of the bat, neatly arranging his kitbag, greeting well-wishers, signing autographs, getting pictures clicked, going to bed early - He may have done all of this one last time.

Today, the final Test match of his career - one that lasted over 24 years - is about to begin. We'll watch him play one last time.

The moment is epochal and so is the setting. Barring the well-protected 22-yard strip, the rest of the Wankhede, on the eve of the Test match, presented the look of a distraught garage running late with repairs.

Hoardings depicting each of his 100 hundreds, with exact scores accompanying relevant pictures adorn the walls of the stadium. Flowers were brought in hundreds of kilograms to cover walls and floors wherever He's likely to walk around. Captains MS Dhoni and Darren Sammy spoke of him extensively, saying they've never seen anything like this ever before.

Fast-paced Mumbai is running faster by the minute right now to save that moment when he'll walk in to bat again.

If it's been tough being him these last two-and-half decades, it'll be tougher being His teammate or an opponent the next five days. There's so much of him happening all around here that it's going to be a task concentrating on the game.

India is unlikely to make changes to the squad that played in Kolkata. West Indies might, depending on whether there is grass left on the pitch before the match or is completely shaved off.

It is also unlikely that the toss will out-and-out favour the team that wins it. The wicket will be more even and harder than what was made available at the Eden Gardens. Once the ball has lost shine, spinners will be in the thick of all action too.

He, who's never allowed conditions to affect him, will once again be given the ball sooner or later. If India bat first, he'll walk in yet again at No. 4.

Somehow, nothing else will matter. For those who've paid handsomely to be at the Wankhede over the next five days, and those who've kept all other work aside to be in front of their television sets this weekend, only the joy of watching him on the field will play on their minds.

There was quite a danger of craving-to-felicitate politicians and eager-to-please cricket administrators overdoing the celebration, to the extent that teams may find the occasion getting the better of the contest.

To avoid the embarrassment, it was he again who took the initiative to let them know that he'd prefer if they didn't go overboard. The effort, therefore, on part of everybody present, will be to ensure that cricket remains the focus.

While he means a lot to Indian cricket, Shivnarine Chanderpaul - who will play his 150th Test - means a great deal to this West Indies team too.

Sammy, who's been a worried man this last week given the way his team batted, will only sweat more if his men find the moment too heady.

So, gear up for a cricket match that will be played in the backdrop of a once-in-a-lifetime retirement where his participation and the eventual hanging of boots will be the only important thing. After this Test, cricket will continue as usual, but only without him around.[/img]
 

[JUGRAJ SINGH]

Prime VIP
Staff member
Re: Sachin Tendulkar to retire after last Test Match Again

Sachin Tendulkar: 'It's simple, India is in love with him
Sachin Tendulkar tiptoed with some difficulty down the steps of the Wankhede Stadium pavilion, loaded with two sets of pads, a helmet and two bats as a lone kid, invited to watch practice, stretched his arm up from behind the partition grille, hoping for the autograph that every Indian boy wants.

It did not look promising yet somehow Tendulkar managed to extricate one hand to sign and make another dream come true. As usual. The way in which the boy’s look of desperation turned to melting joy could have stood for a nation’s mood of anxiety and pleasure. Please, Sachin, just one more time.
Thursday will mark the start of the 40-year-old’s farewell to cricket in India’s second Test against West Indies, an event of such magnitude here in the little titan’s home city of Mumbai that it is impossible to credit the fever, fervour, high emotion – and, yes, plain silliness – that is being generated. It feels like sport’s most spectacular act of veneration.
As the murals of that cherubic face were being painted along with the faces of his craziest fans, an armoured personnel carrier was leading the Indian team bus into the Wankhede for practice with hundreds sprinting and screaming alongside, thrusting arms aloft brandishing mobile phone cameras just for an image of their God.
Meanwhile, the man himself was looking shyly out the window, having thought he must have seen it all now. He certainly had not heard it all, for in a hotel across the city, a surreal whole day’s homage, called the Salaam Sachin Conclave, was underway, featuring a non-stop series of luminaries, like Brian Lara and Sunil Gavaskar, pontificating about Tendulkar’s greatness. For hour upon hour.[/img]
 

[JUGRAJ SINGH]

Prime VIP
Staff member
Re: Sachin Tendulkar to retire after last Test Match Again

Fifty little-known Sachin Tendulkar facts

FAMILY
1. The first school Sachin attended as a child was Indian Education Society's New English School in Bandra East.
2. Sachin's elder brother Ajit Tendulkar had played cricket alongside former India wicketkeeper Chandrakant Pandit and former India opener Lalchand Rajput.
3. In 1990, while returning from the tour of England at the age of 17, Sachin met his wife Anjali for the first time at the Mumbai airport.
4. Sachin got married at the age of 22.
5. Sachin's father-in-law is a seven-time national bridge champion.
6. Sachin's daughter 'Sara' is named after the first tournament Sachin won as a captain - 'Sahara' Cup in 1997.
7. Sachin's father, Ramesh Tendulkar, named him after the famous music director Sachin Dev Burman.
EARLY DAYS
8. Sunil Gavaskar gifted the 14-year-old Sachin a pair of his own ultra-light pads. Those pads were later stolen while Sachin was at the under-15 national camp.
9. Dilip Vengsarkar gifted Sachin a GM bat after he was selected for the under-15 Bombay squad.
10. Dennis Lillie rejected Sachin when he went to the MRF Pace Foundation to become a fast bowler.
11. Sachin met Sourav Ganguly for the first time at the under-15 national camp in Indore.
12. Sachin scored his life's first century for Shradashram Vidyamandir against the Don Bosco School, Matunga, in the Harris Shield quarter-final at Shivaji Park.
13. Sachin's average in the 1988 Harris Shield was 102.5.
14. CCI amended its rules to allow 14-year-old Sachin to use its dressing room.
15. Sachin and Gavaskar were both named among the 36 Bombay Ranji Trophy probables in 1987.
16. Sachin was one of the ball boys during the 1987 World Cup held in India.
Becoming Tendulkar
17. Sachin, Waqar Younis, Salil Ankola and Shahid Saeed made their international debuts together in the 1989 Karachi Test.
18. Sachin's debut Test was Kapil Dev's 100th.
19. Sachin scored a duck in his ODI debut, which was against Pakistan.
20. Sachin scored his first Test century against England at Old Trafford, Manchester, in 1990.
21. Sachin's first bowling figures in both Tests and ODIs are identical: 1-0-10-0.
22. In the Kotla Test against Pakistan where Kumble took a perfect 10, whenever Tendulkar handed Kumble's sweater and cap to the umpire at the start of an over, Kumble took a wicket. So he continued doing that until Kumble took all ten.
23. Sachin made his home international debut against Sri Lanka in 1990.
24. Sachin was the first batsman to be given out by a third umpire in the 1992 Test series in South Africa. The umpire was Karl Liebenberg.
25. In 1992, Sachin became the first overseas cricketer to play for Yorkshire County Cricket Club.
26. Yorkshire Television contributed 30,000 pounds to felicitate Sachin's stint with Yorkshire.
27. A Magnum champagne bottle was gifted to Sachin when he scored his first Test hundred at Manchester in 1990. But he couldn't open it as British rules didn't allow those under 18 to do that. Sachin chose to wait for 8 years and popped it at his daughter Sara's first birthday in 1998.
28. Sachin scored his first century on Indian soil in 1993 against England at the MA Chidambaram Stadium in Chennai.
29. Andrew Symonds once autographed a T-shirt especially for Sachin. It read: "To Sachin, the man we all want to be."
30. In the second ODI on the tour of New Zealand in 1994, Sachin opened the batting for the first time.
31. Sachin has been involved in 20 century partnerships with Rahul Dravid totaling over 6000 runs.
32. It took Sachin 79 matches to score his first ODI century. After that, he scored 48 more.
33. Sachin holds the record for completing his hundred with a six the most number of times by doing it on six occasions.
34. The highest number of centuries hit by Sachin at a single ground have come at the Sharjah Cricket Association Stadium, where he has scored 7 ODI tons.
35. Sachin has also opened batting in Test cricket, but only once - with Sadagopan Ramesh in the Ahmedabad Test against New Zealand in 1999. He made 15.
36. The only Test-playing nation where Sachin has never scored a Test century is Zimbabwe.
37. Sachin has never faced Anil Kumble in a Ranji Trophy game.
38. Sachin became the most-capped Test player after overtaking Steve Waugh's record of 168 Tests.
39. Sachin carries India's national flag in his cricket bag and also sports it on his helmet.
40. Shane Warne accompanied Sachin to Sir Don Bradman's house on the batting legend's 90th birthday.
41. Sachin visited London's Madame Tussauds for the first time in 1988. Twenty years later, the museum had his wax statue.
42. Sachin made guest appearance in a Bollywood movie titled 'Stumped' in 2003.
43. Sachin holds the record for scoring most Test centuries (5) before turning 20.
44. In 2007, Virgin Comics created a new superhero called 'Master Blaster' based on Sachin to launch a new series of comic books.
45. Sachin, Brian Lara and Steve Waugh all had MRF as their bat sponsors. Lara's bat was called 'Wizard', Waugh's 'Champion' and Sachin's 'Genius.'
46. The Future Group launched a toothpaste named after Sachin in 2010. It was called 'Sach'.
47. Sachin's photographer friend Atul Kasbekar convinced him to join Twitter in May 2010.
48. In 2008, Sachin appeared in an Australian reality television series called An Aussie Goes Bolly.
49. The first product endorsed by Tendulkar as teenager was 'Band-Aid'.
50. In 1995, a sports management deal with WorldTel saw Sachin becoming the richest cricketer in the world.[/img]
 

[JUGRAJ SINGH]

Prime VIP
Staff member
Re: Sachin Tendulkar to retire after last Test Match Again

Sachin Tendulkar, the master who was born to bat

NEW DELHI: Sachin Tendulkar's international career spanned 24 years, set new standards for batting and elevated him to demi-god status in India, meaning his retirement leaves a void that may never be filled.

The 'Little Master' will finally depart the scene after playing a record 200th Test match in front of home fans at the Wankhede stadium in Mumbai from Thursday.

The most influential contemporary cricketer, and the highest run-maker in history, will be remembered as an icon who was consistently brilliant, universally admired and modest to a fault.

Tendulkar grabbed the headlines for more than two decades with his record-breaking batting, leaving millions of adoring fans in India and abroad in awe.

Despite years of high-pressure national expectations and fierce media attention, the 40-year-old barely put a foot wrong, remaining the smiling, boyish figure he was when he burst onto the world stage in 1989, aged 16.

An unprecedented 100th international century last year was another landmark for Tendulkar, who holds almost all coveted batting records except Don Bradman's career average of 99.94, or Brian Lara's individual scores of 400 not out in Tests and an unbeaten 501 in first-class cricket.

Tendulkar has played more Tests and one-dayers (463) than any player in history and compiled more runs and centuries in both forms of the game than anyone else.

He has scored 15,847 Test runs at an average of 53.71, with 51 centuries, and 18,426 one-day runs at 44.83 with 49 hundreds, including the first double century in 50-over internationals.

But Tendulkar, ever the team man, said the crowning glory of his career was India's triumphant campaign in the 50-over World Cup in 2011 when they beat Sri Lanka in the final in Mumbai.

Tendulkar remained as passionate about the game as he was on his debut against Pakistan in November, 1989 and worked tirelessly to become one of cricket's greats.

His first Test century, a match-saving effort against England at Old Trafford in 1990, came when he was just 17, and he went on to compile 15 more Test hundreds before he turned 25.

Tendulkar began his one-day career with two successive ducks, and he took 79 matches to record the first of his 49 hundreds in the shorter version when he made 110 against Australia in Colombo in 1994.

He was nearing his 37th birthday when he scored an unbeaten 200 against South Africa in Gwalior in 2010, the only double-century in one-day internationals until team-mates Virender Sehwag and Rohit Sharma followed suit.

In 2012, when just one month short of his 39th birthday, he became the first player to score 100 international centuries -- which, like Bradman's Test average, could be a mark that lasts forever.

Tendulkar still regards that maiden century against England as one of his best, but what followed in Australia in 1991-1992 set the standard for a career as a modern great.

Having scored an unbeaten 148 in the Sydney Test, Tendulkar mastered the spiteful Perth wicket to hit a brilliant 114 against an all-out Aussie pace attack.

The innings prompted veteran English writer John Woodcock to stand up in the press box and declare: "This has to be the best batsman I have ever seen... and unlike most of you, I watched Bradman bat!"

Since then, Tendulkar's longevity and a string of lucrative commercial endorsements for everything from watches to cement has brought him huge wealth.

He has an insatiable love of fast cars and once owned a Ferrari, but his otherwise humble, family-based approach to life has meant fans still feel a close bond with him.

When he moved into a new luxury house in Mumbai with his wife Anjali, a medical doctor, and two children, in 2011, the news was greeted nationwide with the interest of delighted relatives.

Tendulkar is a nominated member of parliament and has also helped raise funds for numerous causes like the crusade against cancer and the creation of basic facilities, particularly toilets for girls, in 140 government schools across the country.[/img]
 

[JUGRAJ SINGH]

Prime VIP
Staff member
Re: Sachin Tendulkar to retire after last Test Match Again

Sachin Tendulkar practices with his son Arjun at Wankhede





Son follows father to work. Father's co-workers indulge the cute kid. Old man steps in when the child's presence affects work. It's a sequence that gets played out at offices around the world all the time.

But when the father is Sachin Tendulkar and the work-place Wankhede Stadium, a teenager's day out in the company of a few affectionate uncles can become the talking point, the focus of all cameras and by evening 'the story of the day'.

Arjun Tendulkar's extended celebration after getting a rather half-serious Amit Mishra to edge a swinging ball had Sachin asking his son to turn back and bowl. When Ishant Sharma fulfilled Arjun's wish of marking his run-up with a measuring tape, just like international cricketers, Tendulkar Sr. intervened again. The junior was asked to drop the act and, once again, told to turn back and bowl.

During his staggered batting session — he was on the pitch thrice in two hours — Tendulkar kept an eye on his little boy. Days away from pulling the curtains down on a life he's lived out of the suitcase — when back-to-back cricket tours constantly interrupted normal family life — Tendulkar has already started playing the doting parent.

As he stood behind the nets watching his son's not quite copybook approach to the stumps, it seemed likely that the celebrated cricketer would now be spotted frequently on the junior circuit, where his son is attempting a Mumbai comeback.

Tendulkar, on Tuesday, wasn't the batsman who, like old times, left the nets last. He didn't take high catches, nor did he sprint between cones. After the long, gruelling run, Tendulkar was finally ambling. The enduring internal duel between his stubborn will and his ageing, injury-ridden body was finally over, it seemed. Tomorrow will be a new day and maybe the match-eve tensions might trigger the old routine. But today Tendulkar, finally, was on a recliner​
 

[JUGRAJ SINGH]

Prime VIP
Staff member
Re: Sachin Tendulkar to retire after last Test Match Again

Sachin Tendulkar receives a trophy from BCCI president N Srinivasan for becoming the first cricketer to play 200 Tests.


West Indies captain Darren Sammy presents a signed jersey to Tendulkar before the start of his 200th.



Clive Lloyd presents Shivnarine Chanderpaul with a memento for his 150th Test.


A specially minted coin to commemorate Tendulkar's 200th Test was used for the toss.





Sachin Tendulkar walks out to field for his final and 200th Test.


Shami struck early for India, removing Chris Gayle in the sixth over of the innings.


 
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