Healthy Living & Healthy food

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Old 07-Aug-2014
Post Healthy Living & Healthy food

Let's add all the good foods you know that can help others,tips on exercises and plans.

you can add recipes or any food ingredient that you think can benefit others with short descriptions !

Old 07-Aug-2014
Re: Healthy Living & Healthy food

1. Greek Yogurt
Regular yogurt’s thicker, creamier cousin is chock-full of protein and probiotics. It fills the belly, improves digestion, and bolsters the immune system. Plus, it's a great healthy recipe substitute for sour cream, cream cheese, and even mayonnaise!

2. Quinoa
This teeny-tiny, grain-like seed packs some serious nutritional prowess. With a mild, nutty flavor and a texture similar to rice or couscous, quinoa is one of the only grains or seeds that provides all nine essential amino acids our bodies can't produce themselves . And it's filled with protein— eight grams per one-cup serving, to be exact!

3. Blueberries
Don’t worry; these berries won't cause an oompa-loompa-like reaction. In fact, they're nutritional superstars, filled with fiber, vitamin C, and cancer-fighting compounds. And studies suggest blueberries may even improve memory !

4. Kale
This rough and tough green beats out all the rest in terms of nutrition, providing more antioxidants than most other fruits and veggies! It's also a fantastic source of fiber, calcium, and iron. Prepare it virtually any way, from boiled or steamed to roasted (try it as a chip!) or stewed.

5. Chia
Ch-ch-ch-chia! Yep, this little seed is the same as those adorable little ceramic animal planters of the 90s! But don’t worry, the nutritious part is not the clay pot. Chia seeds are actually loaded with the most essential fatty acids of any known plant! Plus, one serving of the stuff is loaded with magnesium, iron, calcium, and potassium.

6. Oatmeal
High in fiber, antioxidants, and tons of other nutrients, this breakfast staple has been shown to help lower cholesterol levels, aid in digestion, and even improve metabolism . And it's downright delicious— especially when flavored like pumpkin pie!

7. Green Tea
This ages-old health secret has been used as a natural remedy for everything from cancer to heart disease ! The secret to this delicious drink? Antioxidants! The main superhero here is Epigallocatechin gallate, or EGCG, a phytochemical that slows irregular cell growth, which could potentially help prevent the growth of some cancers .

8. Broccoli
This lean, mean, green machine is packed with vitamins, minerals, disease-fighting compounds, and the fiber essential in any diet. Though all members of the cruciferous vegetable family are super-duper healthy, broccoli stands out for its exceptionally high levels of vitamin C and folate (which can reduce risk of heart disease, certain cancers, and stroke) .

9. Strawberries
Vitamin C is the superstar of this superfood. Just one cup of these red beauties satisfies the daily requirement for vitamin C (74 milligrams per day for women, 90 for men)! Studies suggest the antioxidant helps build and repair the body's tissues, boosts immunity, and fights excess free radical damage. And the vitamin C in strawberries could help promote healthy eye function .

10. Salmon
This heart-healthy fish is packed with protein and a healthy dose of omega-3 fatty acids, which studies suggest may help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. And bonus points: Salmon may also protect skin from the sun and the damaging effects of UV rays.

11. Watermelon
Low in sugar and high in vitamins A and C, this summer treat is the prefect fresh, low-calorie snack. Studies suggest watermelon could also potentially lower blood pressure and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease . And the lycopene in watermelon could help protect the body from UV rays and cancer .

12. Spinach
Antioxidants, anti-inflammatories, and vitamins that promote vision and bone health are what make this little ol' green so super. And those bones will be thanking spinach, too! Just one cup of the stuff packs up to 12 percent of the recommended daily dose of calcium and enough vitamin K to help prevent bone loss.

13. Pistachios
These lil' nuts are hiding lots of protein and fiber behind their earthy flavor and nutty crunch. Plus, they're naturally cholesterol-free. A one-ounce serving of these nuts has almost as much potassium as one small banana.

14. Eggs
A relatively inexpensive protein source loaded with nutrients, eggs certainly earn their superfood status. A single large egg is just about 70 calories and offers six grams of protein. Eggs are also a great source of omega-3 fatty acids, which are essential for normal body function and heart health .

15. Almonds
Surprise! Almonds are the most nutritionally dense nut, meaning they offer the highest concentration of nutrients per calorie per ounce. For just 191 calories, a one-ounce serving provides 3.4 grams of fiber (that's about 14 percent of the daily recommended value) and a healthy dose of potassium, calcium, vitamin E, magnesium, and iron. Plus, you can eat them as BUTTER!

16. Ginger
Slightly spicy but oh-so-enjoyable, ginger has been used for years as a delicious flavoring and an all-natural remedy for everything from an upset stomach to unwanted inflammation.

17. Beets
This all-star veggie contains tons of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants that can help fight disease and strengthen vital organs. And their purple hue may be the secret to their healthy success— some studies suggest betalains, the purple pigments in these veggies, may help ward off cancer and other degenerative diseases .

18. Beans
High in protein and low in cholesterol, beans of any variety can add a healthy twist to any dish (even brownies!). They're also loaded with fiber, folate, and magnesium, and studies have shown that legumes (like beans) can actually help lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of certain cancers (at least in rats…).

19. Pumpkin
Loaded with antioxidants and vitamins, these gourds aren't just for carving (or making into pie). The star nutrient here is beta-carotene, a provitamin that the body converts to vitamin A, which is known for its immune boosting powers and essential role in eye health .

20. Apples
Say it with us, people: "Fiber is good." And apples are a great low-calorie source. (A medium-sized apple weighs in at under 100 calories.) Plus, upping apple intake has been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, certain cancers, diabetes, and asthma .

21. Cranberries
It's time to work these fall favorites into dishes year-round. Whether it's in the shape of a can or fresh off the stove, cranberries have a handful of health benefits and disease-fighting powers . These bacteria-busting berries can help fight inflammation, reduce the risk of heart disease, improve oral health, help prevent ulcers and yeast infections, and may even inhibit the growth of some human cancer cells .

22. Garlic
Yes, it might leave breath less-than-desirable, but these cloves can do more than flavor— they've been used for centuries as food and medicine. These days, garlic is used to treat anything from high blood pressure and heart disease to certain types of cancer. Plus, studies suggest garlic extract can be used to treat yeast infections in women and prostate issues in men .

23. Cauliflower
While all the vitamins and minerals are a great bonus, the real star here is cauliflower's cancer-fighting compounds, glucosinolates. These phytochemicals are responsible for cauliflower's sometimes-bitter flavor, but they have also been shown to prevent damage to the lugs and stomach by carcinogens, potentially protecting agiainst those cancers . And thanks to interactions with estrogen, cauliflower may also help prevent hormone-driven cancers like breast, uterine, and cervical .

24. Leeks
Leeks owe many of their anti-cancer superpowers to their organosulphur compounds. These nutrients have been credited with everything from kicking cancer to boosting immunity . Studies also suggest leeks could help protect the digestive system from stomach and gastric cancers .

25. Lentils
They're pretty cheap, easy to prepare, and high in protein, iron and other essential nutrients. Need we say more? The iron may help fight off anemia (a condition that’s especially common among vegetarians and vegans), and they're low on the glycemic index, too. That means they cause blood sugar to spike less quickly than other starches, so our energy lasts longer.

Old 07-Aug-2014
High Protein Food

What are Mung Beans?

Mung beans are part of the legume family and are a good source of protein. If they are combined with other cereals, a complete protein can be made. When sprouted, mung beans contain vitamin C that is not found in the bean itself.
Health Benefits of Mung Beans

Mung beans are rich in the following nutrients :

• Protein
• Vitamin C
• folic acid or folate
• iron
• Zinc
• potassium
• magnesium
• copper
• manganese
• phosphorus
• thiamine

Mung beans are also high in fibre, low in saturated fat, low in sodium, and contain no cholesterol. Because of the wide range of nutrients contained in mung beans, they offer a whole host of health benefits for -the immune system,
-the metabolism,
-the heart and other organs,
-cell growth,
-protection against free radicals,
-and diseases such as cancer and diabetes.

The folic acid, or folate as it is also known, that is contained in mung beans helps to lower the risk of heart disease, fights birth defects, contributes to normal cell growth, helps in the metabolism of proteins, and is essential for the formation of red blood cells and for healing processes in the body. Another B vitamin, thiamine, is needed to ensure that the nervous system functions properly. It is also important for releasing energy from carbohydrates. Manganese is a trace mineral that is key for energy production and antioxidant defenses. It is also necessary for the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, and can be helpful for the brain and nerves.

Magnesium helps the veins and arteries to relax, lessening resistance and improving the flow of blood, oxygen, and nutrients throughout the body. Research has shown that a deficiency of magnesium is not only associated with a heart attack but that immediately following a heart attack, a lack of magnesium promotes free radical damage to the heart. The body requires copper in order to absorb iron and copper is also involved in the metabolism of protein. Iron helps to build resistance to stress and disease and it is essential for the formation of hemoglobin, which carries oxygen from the lungs to every cell in the body. It is also part of key enzyme systems for energy production and metabolism. Potassium is necessary for maintaining the acid-alkaline balance in the blood and for muscle contraction and a normal heart beat. Zinc is a well known immune system booster and can be helpful in fighting male infertility. Zinc aids healing processes in the body, growth, and tissue repair.

Like all legumes, mung beans are very high in fibre – more so than fruits and vegetables and even better than wholegrains. The soluble fibre in mung beans captures cholesterol in the intestines, keeps it out of the blood stream, and carries it out of the body.
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Old 11-Aug-2014
Re: Healthy Living & Healthy food


Here are a heap of reasons to eat chia:
1. Chia is gluten free
2. It is super high in dietary fibre, making it great for digestion and healing digestion issues.
3. It contains 20% Omega 3 ALA, making it a super food for the brain and heart. Chia has eight times more Omega 3 than salmon!
4. It boasts 20% protein
5. The protein is a complete protein with all 8 essential amino acids
6. It is high in antioxidants (It has a four times higher ORAC value than blueberries)
7. Chia contains five times more calcium than milk
8. Chia contains seven times more vitamin C than oranges
9. It contains three times more iron than spinach
10. It contains twice the potassium content of banana
11. It is food for healthy skin, hair and nails
12. It has a positive impact balancing blood glucose levels (making it awesome for diabetics)
13. Chia makes a great egg replacement. Just combine with water to form a gel, and add it to recipes that call for egg.

Nutritionists recommend that 15g/0.53oz (one tablespoon) of chia is consumed each day. Be sure to drink plenty of water as chia is very high in fiber.

I eat chia seeds sprinkled on my rolled oats for breakfast, in green smoothies, and in chia puddings.
Attached Images

Old 14-Dec-2014
Re: Healthy Living & Healthy food

Timely food, sufficient rest to both mind and body, with little exercise can keep everyone healthy.

Old 06-Jan-2015
Re: Healthy Living & Healthy food

Food and supplements that helps to burn fat:

1. Caffeine - Black Coffee is a good source of caffeine, please include a coffee a day to aid fat burning. Do not have coffee at night, it won't put you to sleep.

2. Green Tea - Anti-oxidants helps in burning fat, so having 2 cups of green tea helps! Please note: too much green tea will deplete your zinc levels.

3. Low GI food - Brown Rice and oats etc that are low GI also helps to burn fat. Don't eat whole heaps of it.

4. High protein - High protein foods with low carbohydrates content will help you to lose weight.

Old 08-Jan-2015
Post Re: Healthy Living & Healthy food

The Benefits Of L-Glutamine Supplement:

Are you supplementing L-Glutamine? If not, maybe you should consider it after reading the following benefits. Glutamine is a carbon and nitrogen donor and helps restore glycogen which restores energy. Glutamine is the most important component of muscle protein, and helps repair and build muscle. Here's a list of glutamine benefits:
Glutamine is the most important component of muscle protein, and helps repair and build muscle.

-Glutamine has been linked to protein synthesis. It prevents your muscle from being catabolized (eaten up) in order to provide Glutamine for other cells in the body.

-Glutamine helps maintain cell volume and hydration, speeding up wound and burn healing and recovery.

-Glutamine benefits you by replenishing declining Glutamine levels during intense workouts.

-Research has shown Glutamine can help you produce growth hormone levels. A study has shown 2 grams of L-Glutamine increased growth hormones by over 400%.

-Glutamine may serve to boost your immune system. For bodybuilders, this is important since heavy workouts tend to greatly deplete Glutamine levels. (Glutamine is a primary energy source for your immune system.)

-Glutamine is one of the most important nutrients for your intestines. It has the ability to 'repair a leaky gut' by maintaining the structural integrity of the bowels.

-Bet you didn't know this: It can even cure ulcers! Studies have found that 1.6 grams of Glutamine a day had a 92% cure rate in 4 weeks.

Researchers are suggesting that Glutamine is the most important amino acid to the bodybuilder. It provides a component in muscle metabolism and cellular support not shared by any other single amino acid, making the benefits of L-Glutamine supplementation a realistic venture.

Old 19-Jan-2015
Re: Healthy Living & Healthy food

Pumpkin SEEDS

Health Benefits

Antioxidant Support

While antioxidant nutrients are found in most WHFoods, it's the diversity of antioxidants in pumpkin seeds that makes them unique in their antioxidant support. Pumpkin seeds contain conventional antioxidant vitamins like vitamin E. However, not only do they contain vitamin E, but they contain it in a wide variety of forms. Alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol, delta-tocopherol, alpha-tocomonoenol and gamma-tocomonoenol are all forms of vitamin E found in pumpkin seeds. These last two forms have only recently been discovered, and they are a topic of special interest in vitamin E research, since their bioavailability might be greater than some of the other vitamin E forms. Pumpkin seeds also contain conventional mineral antioxidants like zinc and manganese. Phenolic antioxidants are found in pumpkin seeds in a wide variety of forms, including the phenolic acids hydroxybenzoic, caffeic, coumaric, ferulic, sinapic, protocatechuic, vanillic, and syringic acid. Antioxidant phytonutrients like lignans are also found in pumpkin seeds, including the lignans pinoresinol, medioresinol, and lariciresinol.
Interestingly, this diverse mixture of antioxidants in pumpkin seeds may provide them with antioxidant-related properties that are not widely found in food. For example, the pro-oxidant enzyme lipoxygenase (LOX) is known to be inhibited by pumpkin seed extracts, but not due to the presence of any single family of antioxidant nutrients (for example, the phenolic acids described earlier). Instead, the unique diversity of antioxidants in pumpkin seeds is most likely responsible for this effect.
Mineral Support

Plants that have a close relationship to the soil are often special sources of mineral nutrients, and pumpkin (and their seeds) are no exception. Our food rating process found pumpkin seeds to be a very good source of the minerals phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, and copper and a good source of the minerals zinc and iron.
Pumpkin seeds have long been valued as a special source of the mineral zinc, and the World Health Organization recommends their consumption as a good way of obtaining this nutrient. To get full zinc benefits from your pumpkin seeds, you may want to consume them in unshelled form. Although recent studies have shown there to be little zinc in the shell itself (the shell is also called the seed coat or husk), there is a very thin layer directly beneath the shell called the endosperm envelope, and it is often pressed up very tightly against the seed coat. Zinc is especially concentrated in this endosperm envelope. Because it can be tricky to separate the endosperm envelope from the shell, eating the entire pumpkin seed—shell and all—will ensure that all zinc-containing portions of the seed get consumed. Whole roasted, unshelled pumpkin seeds contain about 10 milligrams of zinc per 3.5 ounces, and shelled roasted pumpkin seeds (sometimes called pumpkin seed kernels) contain about 7-8 milligrams. So even though the difference is not huge, and even though the kernels still remain a good source of zinc, the unshelled version of this food is going to provide you with the best mineral support with respect to zinc.
Other Health Benefits


Most of the evidence we've seen about pumpkin seeds and prevention or treatment of diabetes has come from animal studies. For this reason, we consider research in this area to be preliminary. However, recent studies on laboratory animals have shown the ability of ground pumpkin seeds, pumpkin seed extracts, and pumpkin seed oil to improve insulin regulation in diabetic animals and to prevent some unwanted consequences of diabetes on kidney function. Decrease in oxidative stress has played a key role in many studies that show benefits of pumpkin seeds for diabetic animals.
Antimicrobial Benefits

Pumpkin seeds, pumpkin seed extracts, and pumpkin seed oil have long been valued for their anti-microbial benefits, including their anti-fungal and anti-viral properties. Research points to the role of unique proteins in pumpkin seeds as the source of many antimicrobial benefits. The lignans in pumpkin seeds (including pinoresinol, medioresinol, and lariciresinol) have also been shown to have antimicrobial—and especially anti-viral— properties. Impact of pumpkin seed proteins and pumpkin seed phytonutrients like lignans on the activity of a messaging molecule called interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) is likely to be involved in the antimicrobial benefits associated with this food.
Cancer-Related Benefits

Because oxidative stress is known to play a role in the development of some cancers, and pumpkin seeds are unique in their composition of antioxidant nutrients, it's not surprising to find some preliminary evidence of decreased cancer risk in association with pumpkin seed intake. However, the antioxidant content of pumpkin seeds has not been the focus of preliminary research in this cancer area. Instead, the research has focused on lignans. Only breast cancer and prostate cancer seem to have received much attention in the research world in connection with pumpkin seed intake, and much of that attention has been limited to the lignan content of pumpkin seeds. To some extent, this same focus on lignans has occurred in research on prostate cancer as well. For these reasons, we cannot describe the cancer-related benefits of pumpkin seeds as being well-documented in the research, even though pumpkin seeds may eventually be shown to have important health benefits in this area.
Possible Benefits for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

Pumpkin seed extracts and oils have long been used in treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH). BPH is a health problem involving non-cancer enlargement of the prostate gland, and it commonly affects middle-aged and older men in the U.S. Studies have linked different nutrients in pumpkin seeds to their beneficial effects on BPH, including their phytosterols, lignans, and zinc. Among these groups, research on phytosterols is the strongest, and it centers on three phytosterols found in pumpkin seeds: beta-sitosterol, sitostanol, and avenasterol. The phytosterols campesterol, stigmasterol, and campestanol have also been found in pumpkin seeds in some studies. Unfortunately, studies on BPH have typically involved extracts or oils rather than pumpkin seeds themselves. For this reason, it's just not possible to tell whether everyday intake of pumpkin seeds in food form has a beneficial impact on BPH. Equally impossible to determine is whether intake of pumpkin seeds in food form can lower a man's risk of BPH. We look forward to future studies that will hopefully provide us with answers to those questions.

Old 26-Jun-2015
Re: Healthy Living & Healthy food

Healthy living is all about healthy balanced diet with regular exercise.

Old 10-Sep-2015
Re: Healthy Living & Healthy food


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